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dc.contributor.advisorGu, Qijun
dc.contributor.authorKim, Heywoong ( )
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-12T17:09:55Z
dc.date.available2020-06-12T17:09:55Z
dc.date.issued2010-12
dc.identifier.citationKim, H. (2010). A simulation framework for performance evaluation and security research in multi-interface multi-channel networks (Unpublished thesis). Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/11613
dc.description.abstractIn wireless networks, devices can be equipped with multiple interfaces to utilize multiple channels and increase the overall throughput of a network. Various channel assignment protocols have been developed to better utilize multiple channels and interfaces However, the research of channel assignment protocols is still lack of a good simulation tool that can content with a variety of requirements and specifications of channel assignment protocols. This thesis proposes MIMC-SIM, a generic simulation framework to study channel assignment protocols in multi-interface and multi-channel networks. The MIMC-SIM framework is built in OMNeT++ with INET and implements a new layer between the network layer and the MAC layer The MIMC-SIM framework has a novel structure which supports generic features and specific behaviors of channel assignment protocols It also provides a generic and flexible code structure for implementing channel assignment protocols.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent147 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectMultiple access protocols
dc.subjectComputer network protocols
dc.subjectComputer networks
dc.titleA Simulation Framework for Performance Evaluation and Security Research in Multi-Interface Multi-Channel Networks
txstate.documenttypeThesis
dc.contributor.committeeMemberChen, Xiao
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGuirguis, Mina S.
thesis.degree.departmentComputer Science
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University--San Marcos
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
txstate.accessrestricted
txstate.departmentComputer Science


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