Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWarms, Richard
dc.contributor.authorPerkins, Dawn A. ( )
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T13:28:30Z
dc.date.available2020-08-07T13:28:30Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.citationPerkins, D. A. (2010). An analysis of healing and honoring ceremonies practiced by Lakota veterans on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (Unpublished thesis). Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/12321
dc.description.abstract

This thesis is an analysis of the healing and honoring ceremonies practiced by Oglala Lakota veterans on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. After a brief history of the Lakota people, Indians in the military, and the reservation, I discuss contemporary reasons that have led some Lakota men and women to join the service.

I then focus on the healing and honoring ceremonies that many veterans participate in, and how these practices have helped them reintegrate to society. These practices include the use of the sweat lodge, Sun Dance, Pow Wows, horseback riding, the Native American Church, music, and Wiping of the Tears ceremony. I argue that the practice and participation of these ceremonies and rituals help veterans heal mentally, physically, and spiritually from the stress of being in the military and/or combat. Additionally, I believe the continued use of these practices allows Lakota veterans to maintain ties to their culture through speaking the Lakota language, bonding with other veterans and community members, and passing traditions on to younger generations.

dc.formatText
dc.format.extent151 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectRites
dc.subjectEthnic identity
dc.subjectTeton Indians
dc.subjectCeremonies
dc.titleAn Analysis of Healing and Honoring Ceremonies Practiced by Lakota Veterans on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation
txstate.documenttypeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentAnthropology
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University--San Marcos
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
txstate.accessrestricted
txstate.departmentAnthropology


Download

This item is restricted to the Texas State University community. TXST affiliated users can access the item with their NetID and password authentication. Non-affiliated individuals should request a copy through their local library’s interlibrary loan service.

If this is your thesis or dissertation, you can make it open access. This will allow all visitors to view the document. To request open access, fill out the form linked below:

https://www.library.txstate.edu/research/digital-collections/Request-Open-Access.html

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record