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dc.contributor.advisorBeall, Gary
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Elizabeth Ann ( )
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T13:28:31Z
dc.date.available2020-08-07T13:28:31Z
dc.date.issued2005-05
dc.identifier.citationPeterson, E. A. (2005). Fundamental studies of clay surface treatments to facilitate exfoliation (Unpublished thesis). Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/12327
dc.description.abstractThe field of nanocomposites technology is growing intensively, especially in the area of polymer/clay nanocomposites [1]. Nanocomposites are a two phase system in which one phase is dispersed in the second phase on a nanometer level [2], Current surface treatment methods have not been successful in completely exfoliating polymer/clay nanocomposites. This research developed a general method of surface and edge treatments in order to help exfoliate organoclay into a given polymer. Several general types of treatments were utilized. These included ion exchange, surface sorption of polymers, and silane edge treatment. Melt compounding of polymer and clay was conducted in a bowl mixer. Physical properties of each nanocomposite were tested by DMT A and tensile testing. X-ray diffraction was also used to determine the extent of the intercalation or exfoliation of polymer/clay nanocomposite.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent78 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectClay surfaces
dc.subjectSurface chemistry
dc.subjectPolymers
dc.subjectNanostructured materials
dc.titleFundamental Studies of Clay Surface Treatments to Facilitate Exfoliation
txstate.documenttypeThesis
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBooth, Chad
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFeakes, Debra
thesis.degree.departmentChemistry and Biochemistry
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University--San Marcos
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
txstate.accessrestricted
txstate.departmentChemistry and Biochemistry


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