Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWilson, Nancy
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Anika Denise ( )
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-13T21:05:26Z
dc.date.available2020-08-13T21:05:26Z
dc.date.issued2020-08
dc.identifier.citationAdams, A. D. (2020). Embodying Gloria Anzaldúa's "New Mestiza" en el Valle (Unpublished thesis). Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/12394
dc.descriptionPresented to the Honors Committee of Texas State University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for Graduation in the University Honors Program, August 2020.en_US
dc.description.abstract

This thesis is a multimedia project that uses an auto-ethnographic approach as the framework and Gloria Anzaldúa’s border language and identity theories to help me understand my own Chicana identity as a third-generation. She is a well-renowned Chicana-queer-feminist writer and theorist, famous for her work about marginal and mixed cultures that develop along the U.S.-Mexico border. I explore how ambiguous and powerful a Chicana border identity can be with the use of traditional 35 mm photography, writing, and video/audio recordings. I attempt to capture the experience of growing up near the border in South Texas, and I also document my family’s oral histories to help explain where I come from. Gloria Anzaldúa’s book Borderlands: The New Mestiza La Frontera unveils how multifaceted a Chicana, Latina, Mexican-American, and Hispanic identity can be as it endures many contradictions in origin, status, and location. Anzaldúa and I are from South Texas, also known as the Rio Grande Valley. It’s a region displaced between American and Mexican culture which emphasizes the complex nature of border identity.

As a third-generation Hispanic, I’ve struggled with speaking Spanish and my legitimacy in my own Chicana identity. Many third-generation Hispanics, like myself, feel less connected to their origin stories, language, and culture while the previous generations have stronger ties to their roots. Using her theories relating to the “New Mestiza” identity, this project attempts to examine the varying levels of our personal relationship with language and identity from first to third generation, using my family and personal experiences. With Anzaldúa’s work, I’m rediscovering my Chicana voice by acknowledging my family’s past and rediscovering the spaces around me again.

en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent89 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectAuto-ethnographyen_US
dc.subjectSouth Texasen_US
dc.subjectAnzaldúa, Gloriaen_US
dc.subjectBorderlandsen_US
dc.subjectLanguageen_US
dc.subjectSpanishen_US
dc.subjectChicanaen_US
dc.subjectIdentityen_US
dc.subjectFamilyen_US
dc.subjectRio Grande Valleyen_US
dc.subjectBinariesen_US
dc.subjectBorder identityen_US
dc.titleEmbodying Gloria Anzaldúa's "New Mestiza" En El Valleen_US
txstate.documenttypeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentHonors College
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University
txstate.departmentHonors College


Download

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record