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dc.contributor.authorChristopher, Karen ( )
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-01T19:29:06Z
dc.date.available2020-11-01T19:29:06Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.identifier.citationChristopher, K. (2015). Paid leaves as buffer zones: Social policies and work-life balance among Canadian mothers. Journal of Research on Women and Gender, 6(1), pp. 24-39.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/12875
dc.description.abstractIn this article, I use in-depth interviews with 26 Canadian mothers to explore their accounts of paid leaves and work-life balance. Drawing from a theoretical framework that emphasizes the structural, cultural, and interactional influences on mothers' experiences, I find that among higher-income mothers, paid leaves serve as "buffer zones" in two ways: they postpone the typical conflict between paid and unpaid work, and they assuage the guilt associated with employment under an intensive mothering ideology. However, low-income and non-citizen mothers have less access to the "buffer zones" of paid leaves, and mothers' reports of work-life balance vary considerably by social class after paid leaves end. Among this non-representative sample, higher-income mothers report the most work-life balance. The paper ends with the implications of this research for the policy and work-life balance literatures.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent16 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTexas State University, Center for Diversity and Gender Studiesen_US
dc.sourceJournal of Research on Women and Gender, 2015, Vol. 6, No. 1, pp. 24-39.
dc.subjectPaid leaveen_US
dc.subjectWork-life balanceen_US
dc.subjectMotherhooden_US
dc.subjectEmploymenten_US
dc.subjectSocial policyen_US
dc.subjectIntensive motheringen_US
dc.titlePaid leaves as buffer zones: Social policies and work-life balance among Canadian mothersen_US
dc.typepublishedVersion
txstate.documenttypeArticle


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