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dc.contributor.authorMoody, Mia ( )
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Robert ( )
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Franci ( )
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-06T14:44:23Z
dc.date.available2020-11-06T14:44:23Z
dc.date.issued2019-03
dc.identifier.citationMoody, M., Rogers, R., & Rogers, F. (2019). Feminist knitting: How stitching together a visual statement for the 2017 Women’s March. Journal of Research on Women and Gender, 9(1), pp. 59-73.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/12903
dc.description.abstractAfter a divisive 2016 U.S. presidential election, a large segment of the population took to social media to express their frustrations and to find solace in the unity created by the Pussyhat Project™ and the 2017 Women’s March. This content analysis examines how Facebook users framed the social movement. Findings indicate that the platform allowed a directed viewpoint to catch momentum. True to fourth wave feminism, the social movement received widespread media coverage and the pink hats became an iconic visual symbol of the Women’s March that helped empower participants and raised awareness about various social injustices.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent14 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTexas State University, Center for Diversity and Gender Studiesen_US
dc.sourceJournal of Research on Women and Gender, 2019, Vol. 9, No. 1, pp. 59-73.
dc.subject2017 Women's Marchen_US
dc.subjectPussyhat Projecten_US
dc.subjectTrump, Donalden_US
dc.subjectFeminist fourth waveen_US
dc.subjectFacebook representationen_US
dc.subjectSocial media advocacyen_US
dc.titleFeminist knitting: How stitching together a visual statement for the 2017 Women’s Marchen_US
dc.typepublishedVersion
txstate.documenttypeArticle


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