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dc.contributor.advisorBaccus, John T.
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Megan M. ( )
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-23T13:44:26Z
dc.date.available2021-02-23T13:44:26Z
dc.date.issued2006-05
dc.identifier.citationJohnston, M. M. (2006). A survey for potential predators of the golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) in relation to different edges at the Balcones Canyonlands Preserve (Unpublished thesis). Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/13226
dc.description.abstractThe Golden-cheeked Warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia), an endangered neotropical migrant, has a restricted breeding range in central Texas. Because of their sensitivity to habitat loss, fragmentation, and limited breeding habitat, the City of Austin, federal, and county agencies purchased tracts of land known as the Balcones Canyonlands Preserve. My study addressed the presence or absence of potential predators of the Golden-cheeked Warbler in different edge types at three sites in the Balcones Canyonlands Preserve. I identified predatory mammals, birds, and snakes using track plate stations, point counts, and visual observations. Five mammalian predators and six avian predators were identified. No snakes were observed. Urban edges as opposed to man-made and natural edges had greater predator activity. Urbanization and fragmentation will continue to increase with human population growth; it is important to develop conservation strategies to protect the habitat of the Golden-cheeked Warblers.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent43 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectGolden-cheeked warbler
dc.subjectPredation
dc.titleA survey for potential predators of the golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) in relation to different edges at the Balcones Canyonlands Preserve
txstate.documenttypeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentBiology
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University -San Marcos
txstate.accessrestricted
txstate.departmentBiology


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