Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGaston, Michele A. ( )
dc.contributor.authorFujii, Akiko ( )
dc.contributor.authorWeckerly, Floyd W. ( Orcid Icon 0000-0002-6669-9817 )
dc.contributor.authorForstner, Michael R. J. ( )
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-09T13:40:12Z
dc.date.available2021-08-09T13:40:12Z
dc.date.issued2010-04-09
dc.identifier.citationGaston, M. A., Fuji, A., Weckerly, F. W., & Forstner, M. R. J. (2010). Potential component Allee effects and their impact on wetland management in the conservation of endangered anurans. PLoS One, 5(4), e10102.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/14239
dc.description.abstractEffective management of wetland quantity and quality is crucial for effective conservation of declining amphibian populations. In particular, frogs and toads that employ aggregative breeding strategies may suffer negative population impacts in response to changes in availability of aquatic breeding habitat, including overabundance of suitable habitat, if density of conspecifics attending aggregations is positively correlated with reproductive success. Here we document such a positive relationship, potentially the first example of a component Allee effect in an anuran, in the critically endangered Houston toad (Bufo houstonensis). We assessed the relationship between mean yearly chorus size and reproductive success of males at the pond level using an information theoretic model selection approach and a two-sample t-test. The chosen model contained the single variable of mean yearly chorus size to predict probability of reproduction, as selected using the Akaike Information Criterion corrected for small sample size and Akaike weight. Mean chorus sizes were significantly higher among ponds exhibiting evidence of reproduction than in those that showed no evidence of reproduction. Our results suggest that chorusing alone is a poor proxy for inference of population stability and highlight a need for reassessment of widely-used amphibian monitoring protocols. Further, amphibian conservation efforts should account for potential Allee effects in order to optimize benefits and avoid underestimating critical population thresholds, particularly in species exhibiting rapid population declines.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent6 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.sourcePLoS One, 2010, Vol. 5, No. 4, Article e10102.
dc.subjectPondsen_US
dc.subjectAllee effecten_US
dc.subjectToadsen_US
dc.subjectAnimal sexual behavioren_US
dc.subjectAmphibiansen_US
dc.subjectEggsen_US
dc.subjectAcousticsen_US
dc.subjectTadpolesen_US
dc.titlePotential Component Allee Effects and Their Impact on Wetland Management in the Conservation of Endangered Anuransen_US
dc.typepublishedVersion
txstate.documenttypeArticle
dc.rights.holder© 2010 Gaston et al.
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0010102
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
dc.description.departmentBiology


Download

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record