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dc.contributor.authorGabor, Caitlin R. ( Orcid Icon 0000-0001-7584-1451 )
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Matthew C. ( )
dc.contributor.authorBosch, Jaime ( Orcid Icon 0000-0002-0099-7934 )
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-09T17:05:06Z
dc.date.available2021-08-09T17:05:06Z
dc.date.issued2013-02-13
dc.identifier.citationGabor, C. R., Fisher, M. C., & Bosch, J. (2013). A non-invasive stress assay shows that tadpole populations infected with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis have elevated corticosterone levels. PLoS One, 8(2), e56054.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/14249
dc.description.abstractBatrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is a fungus that causes the disease chytridiomycosis and is associated with widespread amphibian declines. Populations vary in their susceptibility to Bd infections, and the virulence of the infecting lineage can also vary. Both of these factors may manifest as a differential physiological stress response. In addition, variation in disease susceptibility across amphibian populations may be influenced by immunosuppression caused by chronic stress imposed by environmental factors. Here, we use a non-invasive water-borne hormone technique to assess stress levels (corticosterone) of free-living tadpole populations that are infected by Bd. We found that corticosterone release rates were higher in infected populations of two species of tadpoles (Alytes obstetricans and A. muletensis) than in an uninfected population for both species. The relationship between corticosterone and the intensity of infection differed between species, with only the infected A. obstetricans population showing a significant positive correlation. The higher corticosterone release rates found in A. obstetricans may be an outcome of infection by a highly virulent lineage of Bd (BdGPL), whereas A. muletensis is infected with a less virulent lineage (BdCAPE). These results suggest that different lineages of Bd impose different levels of stress on the infected animals, and that this may influence survival. The next step is to determine whether higher corticosterone levels make individuals more susceptible to Bd or if Bd infections drive the higher corticosterone levels.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent5 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.sourcePLoS One, 2013, Vol. 8, No. 2, Article e56054.
dc.subjectTadpolesen_US
dc.subjectAmphibiansen_US
dc.subjectFungal pathogensen_US
dc.subjectPondsen_US
dc.subjectAmphibian physiologyen_US
dc.subjectMetamorphasisen_US
dc.subjectImmune responseen_US
dc.subjectImmune suppresionen_US
dc.titleA Non-Invasive Stress Assay Shows That Tadpole Populations Infected with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Have Elevated Corticosterone Levelsen_US
dc.typepublishedVersion
txstate.documenttypeArticle
dc.rights.holder© 2013 Gabor et al.
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0056054
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
dc.description.departmentBiology


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