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dc.contributor.authorBehnke, Andrew O. ( )
dc.contributor.authorMacDermid, Shelley ( Orcid Icon 0000-0002-5443-2760 )
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, James C. ( )
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, Howard M. ( )
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-10T15:47:13Z
dc.date.available2021-11-10T15:47:13Z
dc.date.issued2010-05-01
dc.identifier.citationBehnke, A. O., MacDermid, S. M., Anderson, J. C., & Weiss, H. M. (2010). Ethnic variations in the connection between work-induced family separation and turnover intent. Journal of Family Issues, 31(5), pp. 626-655.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1552-5481
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/14816
dc.description.abstractUsing conservation of resources theory, this study examines the role of resources in the relationship between work-induced family separation and workers’ intentions to leave their employment and how these relationships vary across ethnic groups. Analyses of a large representative sample of military members reveal that family separation is significantly related to intent to leave the military and that this relationship is partially mediated by resources for all ethnic groups. Work- and family-related resources are the most strongly related to both separation and turnover for all ethnic groups, but significant ethnic variations are found for most paths in the model. Results are discussed in terms of applications inside and outside the military and potential implications for conservation of resources theory.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent29 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSageen_US
dc.sourceJournal of Family Issues, 2010, Vol. 31, No. 5, pp. 626-655.
dc.subjectTurnoveren_US
dc.subjectConservation of resourcesen_US
dc.subjectFamily supporten_US
dc.subjectEthnicityen_US
dc.subjectMilitaryen_US
dc.titleEthnic Variations in the Connection Between Work-Induced Family Separation and Turnover Intenten_US
dc.typeacceptedVersion
txstate.documenttypeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the Author Accepted Manuscript version of an article published in the Journal of Family Issues.
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X09349034
dc.description.departmentFamily and Consumer Sciences


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