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dc.contributor.authorWarren, Emily ( Orcid Icon 0000-0003-2919-6417 )
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-17T16:57:30Z
dc.date.available2021-11-17T16:57:30Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifierReport No. 2013-33
dc.identifier.citationWarren, E. (2013). Water grand challenges: Water conservation agricultural irrigation (Report No. 2013-33). Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/14853
dc.description.abstract

A driving force behind economic success in Texas is a strong and fertile agricultural industry. Irrigation is vital for productive agricultural practices. Roughly two-thirds of Texas surface and groundwater use is accounted for through irrigation.1 Irrigated agriculture adds $4.7 billion in economic value to the state annually and provides the dominant area of employment for many rural areas.1 While the entire state benefits financially from agricultural success, certain regions depend upon it. Agricultural production accounts for 15 percent of the entire region’s economy in the High Plains, and adds 103,000 jobs directly from crop production.2

Due to regional difference the effects would be felt more severely in different areas if changes to agricultural methods were enacted. In the Texas High Plains, the total regional economic impact of converting all irrigated acres to non-irrigated dryland farming would be an annual net loss of over $1.6 billion of gross output, over $616 million of value added, and nearly 7,300 jobs. Loss of irrigation in the Winter Garden (Frio, Medina, Uvalde, and Zavala counties) would result in a loss of $55 million in vegetable and melon production, $22 million in additional economic activity, and 872 jobs. In Uvalde County alone, total economic impact of irrigated agriculture is estimated at $44 million and supports 600 jobs.1

In light of persistent drought and increasing competing water use demands from the municipal sector, irrigation conservation techniques are paramount to long-term agricultural and water sustainability. To tackle the environmental and economic concerns surrounding irrigation in Texas, continued innovative irrigation techniques are necessary.1

en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent2 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.sourceThe Meadows Center for Water and the Environment. https://www.meadowscenter.txstate.edu/Publications.html
dc.subjectWater qualityen_US
dc.subjectConservationen_US
dc.subjectIrrigationen_US
dc.subjectAgricultureen_US
dc.subjectWater resourcesen_US
dc.subjectGroundwateren_US
dc.titleWater Grand Challenges: Water Conservation Agricultural Irrigationen_US
dc.typepublishedVersion
txstate.documenttypeReport
dc.description.departmentThe Meadows Center for Water and the Environment


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