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dc.contributor.advisorBeebe, Steven A.
dc.contributor.authorKoval, Renee S. ( )
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-07T14:16:28Z
dc.date.available2022-02-07T14:16:28Z
dc.date.issued1999-05
dc.identifier.citationKoval, R. S. (1999). An investigation of the importance of immediacy behaviors, job relevance, and active participation in the training context (Unpublished thesis). Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/15294
dc.description.abstractU.S. companies spend billions on training employees each year, yet there is relatively little research investigating what makes this training effective. In order to investigate this relatively unexplored area, several variables will be borrowed from instructional communication and adult learning theory. Subjects consisted of 188 United States Automobile Association employees who participated in a variety of training sessions offered by the Leadership and Organizational Development department. Using stepwise multiple regression analysis, job relevance and active participation were found to be predictors of affective learning than verbal and nonverbal immediacy. Job relevance was the only significant predictor of behavioral learning. Additional support was found for emotional response theory. Results suggest that communicating job relevance and encouraging active participation are important trainer behaviors.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent90 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectEmployees
dc.subjectTraining
dc.subjectEmotional Response Theory
dc.subjectEmotional responses
dc.subjectImmediacy behaviors
dc.titleAn investigation of the importance of immediacy behaviors, job relevance, and active participation in the training context
txstate.documenttypeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentSpeech Communication
thesis.degree.grantorSouthwest Texas State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
txstate.accessrestricted
dc.description.departmentCommunication Studies


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