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dc.contributor.authorMooney, Kevin ( )en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-02-28T10:04:55Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:04:25Z
dc.date.issued2001-03en_US
dc.identifier.citationMooney, K. (2001). Texas Centennial 1936: African-American Texans and the Third National Folk Festival. Journal of Texas Music History, 1(1), pp. 36-43.
dc.identifier.issn1535-7104
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/2654
dc.description.abstractAfrican-American Texans expressed ethnic as well as regional pride by their efforts to participate in the 1936 celebration of the state’s centennial. Business and educational leaders, primarily from the African-American community in the Dallas area, lobbied the state legislature and Centennial officials to ensure proper representation of their race. Their efforts were manifest in the erection of the Hall of Negro Life Building— an exhibit displaying the progress of African-Americans in Texas and throughout the nation1—and the unprecedented participation of African-American performers at the third National Folk Festival held from the 14th through the 21st of June 1936 at the Texas Centennial Exposition in Dallas. The significance of their actions went beyond the Centennial era. Indeed, Texas Civil Rights leader A. Maceo Smith recalled that, for many African–American Texans, the Centennial "was the kickoff of the real Civil Rights thrust in Texas."en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent8 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe Center for Texas Music Historyen_US
dc.sourceJournal of Texas Music History, 2001, Vol. 1, Issue 1, Article 5.
dc.subjectAfrican Americansen_US
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.subjectFolk festivalsen_US
dc.subjectTexas Centennial 1936en_US
dc.titleTexas Centennial 1936: African-American Texans and the Third National Folk Festivalen_US
dc.typepublishedVersion
txstate.documenttypeArticle


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