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dc.contributor.authorWood, Roger ( )en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-02-28T10:04:55Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:04:34Z
dc.date.issued2001-09en_US
dc.identifier.citationWood, R. (2001). Southeast Texas: Hothouse of zydeco. Journal of Texas Music History, 1(2), pp. 23-44.
dc.identifier.issn1535-7104
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/2665
dc.description.abstractThe neighboring states of Texas and Louisiana share much history and culture, yet in popular consciousness they often seem to be drastically different places. Media-perpetuated stereotypes—such as the Lone Star cowboy riding the open prairie or the savvy Creole paddling through the swamp—are obviously not entirely representative, past or present. Yet they persist, and such public images surely do affect perceptions, the ways others see us and the ways we see ourselves. In truth, however, there are prairies and cowboys in Louisiana as well as swamps and Creoles in southeast Texas. Indeed, the landscape and the people along one side of the Sabine River often have much in common with those along the other. And interchange across that waterway has occurred since the days of the earliest settlements. But the Texas heritage of one of its most fascinating musical results remains largely unrecognized today.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent22 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe Center for Texas Music Historyen_US
dc.sourceJournal of Texas Music History, 2001, Vol. 1, Issue 2, Article 3.
dc.subjectSoutheast Texasen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectMusic cultureen_US
dc.subjectCountry musicen_US
dc.subjectZydecoen_US
dc.titleSoutheast Texas: Hothouse of Zydecoen_US
dc.typepublishedVersion
txstate.documenttypeArticle


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