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dc.contributor.authorOlsen, Allen O.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-20en_US
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:04:38Z
dc.date.issued2007-01-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/2671
dc.description.abstractDuring the 1940s and 1950s, black musicians -- the giants of jazz, R&B, and blues -- traveled the so-called "chitlin' circuit," a network of African-American music venues stretching throughout the American South and Southwest. Although their music is now considered among the greatest that our nation has ever produced, at the time, these artists faced widespread racial discrimination, and most were not allowed to play in the more prominent venues available to white performers. This not only limited the black artists' ability to earn money, but it also prevented their music from reaching a larger audience. As a result, some of the most talented musicians of the era would never enjoy the financial success or public recognition of their white counterparts.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent12 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.sourceJournal of Texas Music History, 2007, Vol. 7, Issue 1, Article 4.
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectCountry musicen_US
dc.subjectConjuntoen_US
dc.subjectTejanoen_US
dc.subjectBluesen_US
dc.subjectR & Ben_US
dc.subjectCajunen_US
dc.subjectZydecoen_US
dc.subjectJazzen_US
dc.subjectGospelen_US
dc.titleThe Post-World War II “Chitlin’ Circuit” in San Antonio and the Long-Term Effects of Intercultural Congenialityen_US
txstate.documenttypeArticleen_US


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