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dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, Brian T.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-13en_US
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:04:40Z
dc.date.issued2010-01-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/2673
dc.description.abstractTownes Van Zandt never was a good fit for this earthly world. After all, the Fort Worth native, a cult figure at best outside the Austin and Nashville music communities during his lifetime, knew his time here would be short. "I don't envision a very long life for myself," a youthful Van Zandt says early in Margaret Brown's 2005 documentary 'Be Here to Love Me.' "Like, I think my life will run out before my work does, you know? I've designed it that way." He lived fast and wrote faster, even as his blueprint devolved into alcoholism and drug addiction. Like his childhood hero, Hank Williams, Van Zandt died on New Year's Day. He rests in Fort Worth's Dido Cemetery.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent22 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.sourceJournal of Texas Music History, 2010, Vol. 10, Issue 1, Article 4.
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectCountry musicen_US
dc.subjectConjuntoen_US
dc.subjectTejanoen_US
dc.subjectBluesen_US
dc.subjectR & Ben_US
dc.subjectCajunen_US
dc.subjectZydecoen_US
dc.subjectJazzen_US
dc.subjectGospelen_US
dc.titleI'll Be Here in the Morning: The Songwriting Legacy of Townes Van Zandten_US
txstate.documenttypeArticleen_US


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