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dc.contributor.authorPatoski, Joe Nick ( )en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-02-27T10:04:55Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:05:13Z
dc.date.issued2001-03-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/2733
dc.description.abstractThat count-off introduction to "Wooly Bully," the song that forever etched Sam Samudio into the institutional memory of pop as Sam the Sham, the turbaned hepcat who led his Pharoahs out of the east Dallas barrio to the big time, holds the key to understanding Tex-Mex and where it fits in the cosmos of all things rock and roll. The rest of the modern world may have perceived the bilingual enumeration as some kind of exotic confection, an unconventional beginning to a giddy rhythm ride of insane craziness. For Samudio, though, screaming "uno, dos, one, two, tres, cuatro" was just doing what comes naturally to a teenager growing up in two cultures in a place not far from the Rio Grande where the First World meets the Third World, and where the Tex meets the Mex.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent3 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe Center for Texas Music Historyen_US
dc.sourceJournal of Texas Music History, 2001, Vol. 1, Issue 1, Article 2.
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectCountry musicen_US
dc.subjectWooly bullyen_US
dc.subjectTex-Mexen_US
dc.titleUno, Dos, One, Two, Tres, Cuatroen_US
txstate.documenttypeArticleen_US


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