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dc.contributor.authorBriley, Ronen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-20en_US
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:05:18Z
dc.date.issued2007-01-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/2741
dc.description.abstractFollowing the re-election of President George W. Bush in 2004, political pundits were quick to credit Christian evangelicals with providing the margin of victory over Democratic challenger John Kerry. An article in the New York Times touted presidential adviser Karl Rove as a genius for focusing the attention of his boss upon such "moral" issues as same-sex marriage and abortion, thereby attracting four million evangelicals to the polls who had sat out the 2000 election. The emphasis of the Democratic Party upon such matters as jobs in the economically-depressed state of Ohio apparently was trumped by the emotionally-charged issues of gay marriage and abortion, which evangelicals perceived as more threatening to their way of life than an economy in decline.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent14 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.sourceJournal of Texas Music History, 2007, Vol. 7, Issue 1, Article 3.
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectCountry musicen_US
dc.subjectConjuntoen_US
dc.subjectTejanoen_US
dc.subjectBluesen_US
dc.subjectR & Ben_US
dc.subjectCajunen_US
dc.subjectZydecoen_US
dc.subjectJazzen_US
dc.subjectGospelen_US
dc.titleWoody Guthrie and the the Christian Left:Jesus and “Commonism”en_US
txstate.documenttypeArticleen_US


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