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dc.contributor.authorLewis, Kerrie P. ( )en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-06T10:06:37Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:06:48Z
dc.date.issued2007-01-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/2878
dc.descriptionResearch Enhancement Program Final Reports.
dc.description.abstractThe question of whether or not the human has garnered some interest in recent years. One line of research in this area concerns the relative size of regions of interest (ROI) in the brains of primates, and tends to focus on interspecific analyzes. In asking and answering questions of interspecific scaling, it is necessary to understand intraspecific scaling. Using over 100 published datasets, I analyzed 48 ROIs in the brains of healthy human adults to understand both [1] relative scaling in the human brain and [2] variability in human brains. I produced allometric equations (OLS and RMA), correlation coefficients, and measures of variation. While for some ROIs there appears to be consistency across studies, more often my findings demonstrate that there exists a high level of variability among datasets that measure the same ROI. The study addresses a number of inconsistencies in the framework of measurement error and statistical bias. Addressing these issues is crucial to our understanding of human brain evolution.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent1 page
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectScalingen_US
dc.subjectHuman brainen_US
dc.subjectROIen_US
dc.subject.classificationAnthropologyen_US
dc.titleScaling of Human Brain Componenten_US
txstate.documenttypeResearch Report


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