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dc.contributor.authorChen, Jian-Yue ( )en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-05-07T10:18:34Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:08:56Z
dc.date.issued2004-10en_US
dc.identifier.citationChen, J. Y. (2004). American studies of Wang Jingwei: Defining nationalism. World History Review, 2(1), pp. 2-34.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/3111
dc.description.abstractWang Jingwei, “veteran revolutionary leader, [and] champion of republicanism, democracy, and national independence,” has remained one of the most controversial figures in the history of republican China because he ended up as the head of the Chinese collaborationist government during World War II.1 Ever since both the Communist and Nationalist governments have condemned Wang as a national traitor (hanjian) as both claim to solely represent the nation. Chinese scholars who have written along the “party lines” have downplayed, if not totally omitted or twisted, Wang’s earlier contributions to modern China.2 Little wonder that Wang has been among the very few Guomindang leaders “still hovering in historical obscurity.”
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent33 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen
dc.sourceWorld History Review, Fall 2004, Vol. 2, Issue 1, Article 2.
dc.subjectAmerican studiesen_US
dc.subjectJingwei, Wangen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectChinese traditionen_US
dc.subjectNationalismen_US
dc.titleAmerican Studies of Wang Jingwei: Defining Nationalismen_US
dc.typepublishedVersion
txstate.documenttypeArticle


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