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dc.contributor.authorPisani, Jana ( )en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-05-04T19:59:03Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:08:58Z
dc.date.issued2003-10en_US
dc.identifier.citationPisani, J. (2003). "He must be despised": Hostility to ministers in early modern Cambridgeshire. World History Review, 1(1), pp. 62-84.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/3115
dc.description.abstractIn The Country Parson (1632) poet and minister George Herbert discussed the relationship between the Anglican clergyman and his parishioners. In Chapter XXVIII, entitled “The Parson in Contempt,” Herbert wrote that all ministers realize “the generall ignominy which is cast upon the profession,” and that this profession ensures that “he must be despised.” He went on to say that such hatred of the ministry had always “been the portion of God his master and of God’s Saints his Brethren, and this is foretold that it shall be so still until things be no more.” Herbert recommended that in order to reach his parishioners spiritually, however, such hostility must be overcome by using “a courteous carriage and winning behaviour,” as well as firm discipline.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent23 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen
dc.sourceWorld History Review, Fall 2003, Vol. 1, Issue 1, Article 4.
dc.subjectCambridgeshireen_US
dc.subjectModern historyen_US
dc.subjectEnglanden_US
dc.subjectArminianismen_US
dc.subjectClerical disciplineen_US
dc.subjectAlaypersonen_US
dc.subjectPuritanismen_US
dc.titleHe Must be Depised: Hostility to Ministers in Early Modern Cambridgeshireen_US
dc.typepublishedVersion
txstate.documenttypeArticle


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