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dc.contributor.advisorJuarez, Ana M.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Sarah A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-05T18:59:47Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:11:10Z
dc.date.issued2010-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/3290
dc.descriptionPresented to the Honors Committee of Texas State University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For Graduation in the University Honors Program, January 2010.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis uses ethnographic and historical data to examine how the worldview of a culture directly affects the birth practices utilized by that culture, in this case, the United States and Mexico. Two worldviews are analyzed for their influence on childbirth practices—the Western worldview, and the ecological worldview, which have molded and formed biomedical and midwifery practices, respectively.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent64 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectConceptionsen_US
dc.subjectBirthen_US
dc.subjectBirth practicesen_US
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_US
dc.subjectMexicoen_US
dc.subject.classificationAnthropologyen_US
dc.titleConceptions of Birth: A Theoretical Analysis of Birth Practices in the US and Mexicoen_US
txstate.documenttypeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentHonors College
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University


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