Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPrentice, Tina Forward ( )
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-05T18:33:04Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:14:57Z
dc.date.issued2006-12-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/3590
dc.descriptionAn Applied Research Project Submitted to the Department of Political Science, Texas State University, in Partial Fulfillment for the Requirements for the Degree of Masters of Public Administration, Fall 2006.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis applied research project looked at the grant criteria commonly used to make funding decisions within public and private foundations in Austin, Texas. Eight executive directors, program officers, and/or board trustees from eight community health foundations were interviewed. The goal was to extract information about the requirements, qualities, and characteristics each foundation considered the most rewarding for a non-profit organization requesting funding. Some of the foundations interviewed funded multiple initiatives, with public health being the common thread amongst them all. Interviews were conducted from September 8 to September 29, 2006. Document and archival data analysis and structured interviews with foundation officers provided evidence that either supported or refuted the five working hypotheses developed to determine the most desirable grant criteria within public health foundations. The findings were in favor of each set of working hypotheses. Most of the public health foundations were created with a set of focus areas in mind to fund non-profit public health initiatives in the same field of expertise (WH1 : FOCUS AREAS). Most of the foundations exist to fund unmet social needs and often give preference to grant applicants who are able to communicate the scope of the unmet need in the community (WH2 : SOCIAL NEED). The majority of the public health foundations want to have a significant impact on improving the health of Central Texans (the Austin area) and prefer grant applicants to provide proof of impact if funding needs are met (WH3 : IMPACT). The majority of the public health foundations looked highly upon sustainbility within the organization and required grant applicants to provide proof of outside funding and collaborative efforts (WH4 : SUSTAINABILITY). Finally, an overwhelming number of public health foundations required grant applicants to exhibit sound financial practices and appropriate financial documents to prove the organization's financial accountability (WH5 : FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY).en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent178 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectGrant makingen_US
dc.subjectPublic foundationsen_US
dc.subjectPrivate foundationsen_US
dc.subjectAustinen_US
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.subjectPublic health initiativesen_US
dc.titleCase Study Research: Exploring the Most Commonly Used Grantmaking Criteria within Public and Private Foundations in Austin, Texas and Other Foundations Funding Austin, Texas Public Health Initiativesen_US
txstate.publication.titleApplied Research Projects, Texas State Universityen_US
txstate.documenttypeResearch Reporten_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberShields, Patricia M.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSaldana, Tamela


Download

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record