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dc.contributor.authorShields, Patricia M. ( Orcid Icon 0000-0002-0960-4869 )
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-12T10:19:52Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:19:52Z
dc.date.issued1996-11-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationShields, P. M. (1996). Pragmatism: Exploring public administration's policy imprint. Administration and Society, 28(3), pp. 390-411.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/3963
dc.description.abstractPublic administrators are often described as pragmatic. Yet few scholars have investigated what this might mean. This article introduces the notion of policy imprint-the effect that professional groups have on policy. Pragmatism is championed as an organizing principle that explains the public administration (PA) policy imprint. The pragmatism of William James and John Dewey is described and applied to PA. Because PA leaves its imprint where theory and practice meet, the article examines the theory-practice nexus through the lenses of pragmatism. Finally, pragmatism's link to democracy is developed.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent35 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.sourceAdministration and Society, 1996, Vol. 28, No. 3, pp. 390-411.
dc.subjectPragmatismen_US
dc.subjectPublic administrationen_US
dc.subjectJames, Williamen_US
dc.subjectDewey, Johnen_US
dc.subjectPolicy imprintsen_US
dc.titlePragmatism: Exploring Public Administration's Policy Imprinten_US
dc.typeacceptedVersion
txstate.documenttypeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the accepted manuscript version of an article published in Administration and Society.
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/009539979602800305
txstate.departmentPolitical Science


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