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dc.contributor.authorOlson, Donald W. ( )en_US
dc.contributor.authorDoescher, Russell L. ( )en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-01T10:21:02Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:20:48Z
dc.date.issued1994-06en_US
dc.identifier.citationOlson, D. W., & Doescher, R. L. (1994). D-Day: June 6, 1944. Sky & Telescope, 87(6), pp. 84-88.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/4031
dc.description.abstractIn this article Donald Olson and Russell Doescher explain why the advancing tide on D-day in 1944, rising as swiftly as a foot every 10 minutes, drove many Allied demolition teams toward the sea wall before they were able to clear gaps through German obstacles in Omaha Beach. As a result, the early assault waves had to slog forward through mined stakes, ramps, and "hedgehogs," as portrayed in this still photograph from 'The Longest Day,' the classic 1962 film about the Normandy invasion.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent5 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSky Publishing Corp.
dc.sourceSky & Telescope, 1994, Vol. 87, No. 6, pp. 84-88.
dc.subjectMoonen_US
dc.subjectD-Dayen_US
dc.subjectTidesen_US
dc.subjectWorld War IIen_US
dc.subject.classificationAstrophysics and Astronomyen_US
dc.subject.classificationMilitary Historyen_US
dc.subject.classificationUnited Statesen_US
dc.titleD-Day: June 6, 1944en_US
dc.typepublishedVersion
txstate.documenttypeArticle
txstate.departmentPhysics


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