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dc.contributor.advisorRoyal, Cindy L.
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Kathryn Renee
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T18:25:39Z
dc.date.available2015-08-19T18:25:39Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5626
dc.descriptionPresented to the Honors Committee of Texas State University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For Graduation in the Honors College, May 2015.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2014 women represented 51% of the professional and technical work force in the U.S., while in the same year, women held 5.1% of Fortune 500 CEO positions (Dorning, Catalyst, Historical List of Women CEOs of the Fortune Lists). Women reach the top in successful multimillion-dollar companies, but are stopping short of earning the title Chief Executive Officer (CEO). The ones that are able to take hold of the CEO position are the outliers in society. This level of success is attributed to patterns in their career paths. What do these women have in common? This work examines five different women that have become CEOs and utilizes their different experiences to identify specific points that they share. An explanation of these five executives provides insight into what women must do to become CEO. The theory is that these patterns have contributed to at least part, if not for the whole, of their success.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent37 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectWomen CEOsen_US
dc.subjectMedia industryen_US
dc.subjectWomen in leadership rolesen_US
dc.titleWomen In the Men's Club: How to Survive the Chief Executive Officer Positionen_US
txstate.documenttypeThesis
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMandziuk, Roseann
thesis.degree.departmentHonors College
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism and Mass Communication
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University
txstate.departmentHonors College


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