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dc.contributor.authorWright, Walter A.
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-31T20:29:40Z
dc.date.available2015-08-31T20:29:40Z
dc.date.issued1978
dc.identifier.citation"Arbitration Clauses in Adhesion Contracts," 33 Arbitration Journal 41 (1978).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5638
dc.description.abstractArbitration has long been valued as a voluntary process. Under ideal circumstances, two parties of relatively equal bargaining power agree to arbitrate as an alternative to litigation. A major exception to this rule occurs in the area of adhesion contracts. Standard form contracts reduce the time and cost involved in bargaining individual agreements. Yet, in using such a contract, a weaker party must agree--without any real choice--to arbitrate disputes in order to obtain goods or services it requires. Courts have often refused to enforce adhesion contracts or any of its terms when they have concluded that the stronger bargaining party has abused its dominant position. The author reviews the factors the courts weigh in making that decision.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent5 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectArbitrationen_US
dc.subjectAdhesion contractsen_US
dc.subjectStandard form contracten_US
dc.subjectDispute resolutionen_US
dc.titleArbitration Clauses in Adhesion Contractsen_US
txstate.documenttypeArticleen_US
txstate.departmentPolitical Science


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