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dc.contributor.advisorErhart, Elizabeth M.
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Jaydee Janelle ( )
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-24T19:09:29Z
dc.date.available2016-08-24T19:09:29Z
dc.date.created2013-08
dc.date.issued2013-07-11
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6272
dc.description.abstractThis is the first thesis based on geometric morphometric comparison of the navicular bone across different primate species. The navicular bone is involved in three important functions in the modern human foot related to human obligate bipedalism. Obligate bipedalism is a distinguishing feature of humans and by comparing how the overall size and shape of the navicular bone differ among modern humans, chimpanzees, baboons, and fossil Olduvai Hominid 8 (Homo habilis), paleoanthropologists will be able to better describe the evolution of bipedalism in our lineage. I found that the OH 8 navicular is more similar in shape to that of modern humans and more similar in size to chimpanzees. Bones of the foot, such as the navicular, can therefore be used to assess the mode of locomotion in a fossil species and can aid in the placement of new fossils within the hominin lineage.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent60 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectHomo habilis (OH 8)
dc.subjectBipedalism
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectBaboons
dc.subjectChimpanzees
dc.subjectNavicular
dc.subjectGeometric morphometrics
dc.titleA Geometric Morphometric Analysis of the Navicular Bone in Humans, Chimpanzees, Baboons, and Homo Habilis (OH 8)
txstate.documenttypeThesis
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSpradley, M. Katherine
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCunningham, Deborah L.
thesis.degree.departmentAnthropology
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
txstate.departmentAnthropology


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