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dc.contributor.advisorShields, Patricia M.
dc.contributor.authorMcDaniel, Jasmine C. ( )
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-16T20:27:08Z
dc.date.available2017-05-16T20:27:08Z
dc.date.issued2017-05en_US
dc.identifier.citationMcDaniel, J. C. (2017). Police Training on Domestic Violence: Bengt-Ake Lundvall’s Taxonomy of Knowledge Principles. Masters of Public Administration, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/6586
dc.description.abstract

Police training on domestic violence is one of the best methods to ensure officers are responding appropriately. Once training is complete, it is, however, important that the quality of the training is high. This case study can provide management with ways to improve domestic violence training.

Purpose: This Applied Research Project (ARP) is presented in a triplex. First, this ARP uses Dr. Bengt‐Ake Lundvall four knowledge taxonomy principles (know‐what, know‐how, know‐why, know‐who) to develop a police training assessment tool to evaluate family violence training. Second, this paper uses Lundvall's knowledge taxonomy principles to evaluate police officer’s domestic violence training in the City of Dallas. Third, the findings are used to provide recommendations to improve Dallas city police department training.

Method: This case study usesthe Lundvall'sframework to explore the City of Dallas police training on domestic violence. Structures interviews and document analysis were used to perform this assessment.

Findings: Based on the structured interviews and document analysis, the City of Dallas police training on domestic violence is functioning well and effectively. However, among the Lundvall's four knowledge principles, evidence shows know what was limited. In order to further develop Lundvall's principles for the City of Dallas police training on family violence, the know what should be addressed. Lundvall's know why is the strongest supported in this case study. Officers should continuously learn the know why to align with Lundvall's principles for the police training on domestic violence. Each of Lundvall's knowledge taxonomy principles are prioritized differently.

Based on findings in this case study, the following list prioritizes Lundvall's principles:

  1. Know how
  2. Know why
  3. Know who
  4. Know what

Take away: Overall, the City of Dallas police training on family violence uses Lundvall's knowledge principles to ensure officers are responding appropriately. Structured interviews and document analysis were affective data collection methods to explore Lundvall's knowledge taxonomy principles in Dallas City police training on domestic violence. Based on the findings, know how knowledge principle provides the strongest support in this Applied Research Project (ARP). Know why and know who knowledge principles yields limited support in this case study. However, this ARP essentially failed to provide support for Lundvall's know what principle.

en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent107 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.sourceAn Applied Research Project Submitted to the Department of Political Science, Texas State University, in Partial Fulfillment for the Requirements for the Degree of Masters of Public Administration, Spring 2017.
dc.subjectFamily violenceen_US
dc.subjectTrainingen_US
dc.subjectLundvallen_US
dc.subjectDomestic violenceen_US
dc.subjectPrinciplesen_US
dc.titlePolice Training on Domestic Violence: Bengt-Ake Lundvall’s Taxonomy of Knowledge Principlesen_US
txstate.documenttypeResearch Reporten_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSmith, David
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGillfillan, Abigail
txstate.departmentPolitical Science


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