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dc.contributor.advisorHarter, Rod A.
dc.contributor.authorMendenhall, Troy ( )
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-07T20:17:24Z
dc.date.available2018-08-07T20:17:24Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-17
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7415
dc.description.abstractContext: The loss of shoulder internal rotation range of motion is common maladaptation that predisposes overhead sport athletes to injury. Instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) has recently been suggested as an alternative to stretching exercises to reestablish normal range of motion. Objective: To determine the extent to which a 4-week program of traditional stretching plus IASTM improves glenohumeral range of motion compared to stretching alone. Our secondary purpose was to measure the effects of these interventions using two patient-rated outcome measures of shoulder function. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Combined laboratory and field study. Participants: 20 intercollegiate baseball players; 10 in the Stretching + IASTM Group (age, 20.9 + 0.9 yrs; height, 180.8 + 8.1 cm; mass 85.7 + 7.2 kg), and 10 in the Stretching group (age, 19.9 + 1.4 yrs; height, 183.4 + 7.4 cm; mass, 87.1 + 8.5 kg). Interventions: Participants in the Stretching group received a clinician-administered shoulder stretching program 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to the Stretching + IASTM group received the same stretching program, plus IASTM treatments twice per week for 4 weeks. All participants completed the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic Shoulder and Elbow (KJOC) score and the Functional Arm Scale for Throwers (FAST) at the beginning and end of the study. Main Outcome Measures: Shoulder internal rotation, external rotation, and horizontal adduction passive range of motion (PROM); glenohumeral total range of motion (TROM); and the KJOC and the FAST. Statistical Analyses: Five Group (2) x Time (2) between-within ANOVAs were performed ( = 0.05). We also calculated Pearson correlations between the KJOC and FAST questionnaire scores. Results: Internal rotation PROM significantly improved from Week 0 to Week 4 in both treatment groups (p = 0.005). Stretching group mean internal rotation PROM increased 6.3%, from 52.8o + 8.7o to 56.1o + 8.4o, while Stretching + IASTM group average internal rotation PROM improved 7.8%, from 52.6o + 7.2o to 56.7o + 4.5o over the course of this study. Total range of motion (TROM) improved 3.1% in the Stretching group, from 145.2o + 17.0o to 149.7o + 18.4o, and 4.2% in the Stretching + IASTM group, from 143.0o + 8.4o to 149.0o + 10.6o between Week 0 and Week 4, respectively (p = 0.005). The KJOC and the FAST scores were inversely related at both the outset (r = -0.874, p = 0.001) and conclusion of our 4-week intervention (r = -0.765, p = 0.001). Conclusions: While both treatment protocols were effective in increasing glenohumeral internal rotation PROM and TROM, the IASTM protocol we employed did not have a significant effect on any of our disease-oriented outcome measures after 4 weeks. Future research studies should compare the effects of multiple IASTM treatment frequencies and durations to more fully evaluate the capacity of IASTM to create long-term improvements in glenohumeral joint range of motion and function.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent86 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectInstrument-assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization
dc.subjectTotal Range of Motion
dc.subjectPatient-rated Outcomes
dc.subjectOverhead Sport Athletes
dc.subject.lcshStretching exercisesen_US
dc.subject.lcshJoints--Range of motionen_US
dc.subject.lcshShoulderen_US
dc.subject.lcshPhysical therapyen_US
dc.titleComparison of Instrument-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization and Passive Stretching to Improve Glenohumeral Range of Motion and Function
txstate.documenttypeThesis
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMyers, Natalie L.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcCurdy, Kevin
thesis.degree.departmentHealth and Human Performance
thesis.degree.disciplineAthletic Training
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
txstate.departmentHealth and Human Performance


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