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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Cassandra M.
dc.contributor.authorSharkey, Joseph R.
dc.contributor.authorLackey, Mellanye J.
dc.contributor.authorAdair, Linda S.
dc.contributor.authorAiello, Allison E.
dc.contributor.authorBowen, Sarah K.
dc.contributor.authorFang, Wei
dc.contributor.authorFlax, Valerie L.
dc.contributor.authorAmmerman, Alice S.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-12T19:22:23Z
dc.date.available2018-12-12T19:22:23Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-03
dc.identifier.citationJohnson, C. M., Sharkey, J. R., Lackey, M. J., Adair, L. S., Aiello, A. E., Bowen, S. K., Fang, W., Flax, V. L., & Ammerman, A. S. (2018). Relationship of food insecurity to women's dietary outcomes: A systematic review. "Nutrition Reviews," 76(12), pp. 910-928. doi: 10.1093/nutrit/nuy042en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7803
dc.description.abstractContext: Food insecurity matters for women's nutrition and health. Objective: This review sought to comprehensively evaluate how food insecurity relates to a full range of dietary outcomes (food groups, total energy, macronutrients, micronutrients, and overall dietary quality) among adult women living in Canada and the United States. Data Sources: Peer-reviewed databases (PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science) and gray literature sources from 1995 to 2016 were searched. Data Extraction: Observational studies were used to calculate a percentage difference in dietary intake for food-insecure and food-secure groups. Results: Of the 24 included studies, the majority found food-insecure women had lower food group frequencies (dairy, total fruits and vegetables, total grains, and meats/meat alternatives) and intakes of macro- and micronutrients relative to food-secure women. Methodological quality varied. Among high-quality studies, food insecurity was negatively associated with dairy, fruits and vegetables, grains, meats/meats alternatives, protein, total fat, calcium, iron, magnesium, vitamins A and C, and folate. Conclusions: Results hold practical relevance for selecting nutritional targets in programs, particularly for nutrient-rich foods with iron and folate, which are more important for women’s health.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent19 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.sourceNutrition Reviews, 2018, Vol. 76, Issue 12, pp. 910-928. Oxford University Press.
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectDiet recordsen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectFood supplyen_US
dc.subjectHungeren_US
dc.subjectNutrition policyen_US
dc.subjectReview literature as topicen_US
dc.titleRelationship of Food Insecurity to Women's Dietary Outcomes: A Systematic Reviewen_US
txstate.documenttypeArticle
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuy042


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