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dc.contributor.authorMiner, Joshua ( )
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-08T17:47:32Z
dc.date.available2019-02-08T17:47:32Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-04
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7852
dc.description.abstractThe making-visible onscreen of women’s experiences has been a central concern of Indigenous digital media. Likewise, recent Indigenous rights movements have called attention to how the cultural disjuncture of women’s bodies and environment perpetuates settler-colonial violence. Where these two energies meet, an array of activist media reaffirms that relationship—Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers’ short video “Bloodland” (2011), the first #MMIW crowdmaps (2013), and the #AmINext photo campaign (2014) among them. Taking hold of digital platforms that facilitate new modes of expression, Indigenous game designers and artists have used animation to explore the computational relation between digital bodies and places, articulating the processes of Indigenous women’s embodied sovereignty.en_US
dc.formatImage
dc.format.extent29 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.sourceDigital Frontiers Annual Conference, 2018, Lawrence, Kansas, United States
dc.subjectDigital mediaen_US
dc.subjectIndigenousen_US
dc.subjectSettler-Colonial violenceen_US
dc.titleIndigenous Computational Bodies and Settler-Colonial Violenceen_US
txstate.documenttypePresentation


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