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dc.contributor.authorRenold, Leah M. ( )
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-22T15:47:34Z
dc.date.available2019-02-22T15:47:34Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationRenold, L. (2002). Fundamentalism. In John Collins and Ross Glover (Ed.), Collateral Language: A User's Guide to America's New War (pp. 94-108). New York, NY: New York University Press.
dc.identifier.isbn9.78081E+12
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/7903
dc.description.abstractWe are at war, declares an article in the "New York Times" published shortly after the attacks on the World Trade Center. The author, Andrew Sullivan, argues that we are in a religious war, a war that threatens our very existence. Not only our lives, but also our souls are at stake. Who is the enemy? It is not Islam. It is a specific form of Islam called fundamentalism. In his essay Sullivan argues that fundamentalism constitutes a large section of Islam. The article explains that fundamentalism has ancient roots and has attracted thousands of adherents for centuries from different religious faiths, including Christianity and Judaism.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent15 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNew York University Pressen_US
dc.sourceCollateral Language: A User's Guide to America's New War, 2002, pp. 94-108
dc.subjectFundamentalismen_US
dc.subjectPoliticsen_US
dc.subjectWar on terrorismen_US
dc.subjectRhetoricen_US
dc.subjectReligionen_US
dc.subjectMediaen_US
dc.titleFundamentalismen_US
txstate.documenttypeBook Chapter
txstate.departmentHistory


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