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dc.contributor.advisorFoster, Illysa R.
dc.contributor.authorHam, Emma
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-05T14:08:17Z
dc.date.available2019-06-05T14:08:17Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8239
dc.description.abstractAdolescence is a period of life full of change, whether it be physical change or psychological change. As part of this psychological change and in preparation for adulthood, adolescents must properly develop self-regulation and executive functioning. These aspects are vital for goal-setting, planning, staying on task, and attending to tasks later in their life. With social media becoming more and more prevalent, it is important to understand how the use of social media affects adolescent development. Increasing social media use is being driven by adolescents, prompting the exploration of its influence and development of these cognitive processes. Increased use of social media is affecting the development of various regulatory behaviors throughout adolescence. As these behaviors play a role in goal-setting and planning, social media is also shaping how adolescents plan for their future, make goals, and carry out those goals. Regulatory behaviors also play a role in determining the amount of time adolescents spend on social media, creating a bidirectional influence of the two subjects. I will be exploring the impact social media has on the facilitation of developing these aspects and how self-regulation and executive functioning play a role in the amount of time spent on social media.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent36 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectAdolescent developmenten_US
dc.subjectSocial mediaen_US
dc.subjectExecutive functioningen_US
dc.subjectSelf-regulationen_US
dc.subjectAdolescenceen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmenten_US
dc.subjectSocial media useen_US
dc.titleThe Bidirectional Influence of Social Media and Adolescent Development of Self-Regulation and Executive Functioningen_US
txstate.documenttypeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentHonors College
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University
txstate.departmentHonors College


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