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dc.contributor.authorStraubhaar, Rolf
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-16T15:53:49Z
dc.date.available2019-07-16T15:53:49Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationStraubhaar, R. (2013). Student use of aspirational and linguistic social capital in an urban immigrant-centered English immersion high school. The High School Journal, 97(2), 92-106.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0018-1498
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8312
dc.descriptionThis is the accepted manuscript version of an article published in The High School Journal.
dc.description.abstractExpanding upon Yosso's theory of community cultural wealth, this interview-based qualitative study finds that Mexican youth in an urban two-year English immersion high school here referred to as Literacy High are assisted academically by what Yosso would call their aspirational capital and what the present article theorizes as their linguistic social capital, or their ability to utilize a Spanish-speaking student network to understand assignments and instructions. Among these students, opinions regarding the need to develop oral English proficiency vary widely, with some students choosing Spanish as a form of resistance while others feel anxiety regarding their lack of fluency in spoken English.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent31 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of North Carolina Pressen_US
dc.sourceThe High School Journal, Winter 2013, Vol. 97, No. 2, pp. 92-106.
dc.subjectSocial capitalen_US
dc.subjectLinguistic capital
dc.subjectImmigrant education
dc.subjectEnglish immersion settings
dc.titleStudent use of Aspirational and Linguistic Social Capital in an Urban Immigrant-centered English Immersion High Schoolen_US
txstate.documenttypeArticleen_US
txstate.departmentCounseling, Leadership, Adult Education, and School Psychology


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