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dc.contributor.authorLitchke, Lyn G.
dc.contributor.authorRussian, Christopher J.
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Lisa K.
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Eric
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Larry R.
dc.contributor.authorWalker, John L.
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-07T15:35:58Z
dc.date.available2019-08-07T15:35:58Z
dc.date.issued2007-06
dc.identifier.citationLitchke, L. G., Russian, C. J., Lloyd, L. K., Schmidt, E. A., Price, L., & Walker, J. L. (2008). Effects of respiratory resistance training with a concurrent flow device on wheelchair athletes. The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine, 31(1), pp. 65-71.
dc.identifier.issn2045-7723
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8484
dc.descriptionThis is the accepted manuscript version of an article published in the The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine.
dc.description.abstractBackground/Objective: To determine the effect of respiratory resistance training (RRT) with a concurrent flow respiratory (CFR) device on respiratory function and aerobic power in wheelchair athletes. Methods: Ten male wheelchair athletes (8 with spinal cord injuries, 1 with a neurological disorder, and 1 with postpolio syndrome), were matched by lesion level and/or track rating before random assignment to either a RRT group (n ¼ 5) or a control group (CON, n ¼ 5). The RRT group performed 1 set of breathing exercises using Expand-a-Lung, a CFR device, 2 to 3 times daily for 10 weeks. Pre/posttesting included measurement of maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), and peak oxygen consumption ( ̇ V O 2 peak ). Results: Repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant group difference in change for MIP from pre- to posttest ( P , 0.05). The RRT group improved by 33.0 cm H 2 O, while the CON group improved by 0.6 cm H 2 O. Although not significant, the MVV increased for the RRT group and decreased for the CON group. There was no significant group difference between ̇ V O 2 peak for pre/posttesting. Due to small sample sizes in both groups and violations of some parametric statistical assumptions, nonparametric tests were also conducted as a crosscheck of the findings. The results of the nonparametric tests concurred with the parametric results. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that 10 weeks of RRT training with a CFR device can effectively improve MIP in wheelchair athletes. Further research and a larger sample size are warranted to further characterize the impact of Expand-a-Lung on performance and other cardiorespiratory variables in wheelchair athletes.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent8 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.sourceThe Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine, 2008, Vol. 31, No. 1, pp. 65-71
dc.subjectSpinal cord injuriesen_US
dc.subjectPulmonary function tests
dc.subjectRespiratory function tests
dc.subjectRespiratory therapy
dc.subjectWheelchair sports
dc.subjectParalympics
dc.titleEffects of Respiratory Resistance Training With a Concurrent Flow Device on Wheelchair Athletesen_US
txstate.documenttypeArticle
dc.identifier.doihttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10790268.2008.11753983
txstate.departmentHealth and Human Performance


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