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dc.contributor.authorWeaver, Russell
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-15T19:59:16Z
dc.date.available2019-08-15T19:59:16Z
dc.date.issued2015-07
dc.identifier.citationWeaver, R. (2015). The racial context of convenience voting cutbacks: Early voting in Ohio during the 2008 and 2012 U.S. presidential elections. SAGE Open, 5(3).en_US
dc.identifier.issn2158-2440
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8519
dc.description.abstractClassic models of democratic political behavior imply that eliminating opportunities to vote early in person (EIP) negatively affects the political participation of voters who prefer to use that option. Nevertheless, several U.S. state legislatures recently passed or proposed laws to scale back their EIP voting operations. Such efforts have met with opposition, as both academic researchers and federal courts have found that minority voters, especially African Americans, now utilize EIP voting at significantly higher rates than White voters. Prior to the 2012 presidential election, this argument was central to a federal court’s decision to temporarily block legislation in Ohio that sought to cut several days from the state’s EIP voting period. A post-election legal battle is reconsidering this matter, and the outcome will shape Ohio’s voting rules going forward. This article contributes empirical results to the discourse by estimating EIP voting take-up rates, by race, during the 2008 and 2012 U.S. presidential elections in Ohio’s three largest counties. Ecological inference models reveal that African Americans in all three study areas voted EIP at substantially higher rates than White voters during both elections. These results are supported by decile tables that report early voting behavior for relatively racially homogeneous geographies, and by geovisualizations that depict direct relationships between the spatial distributions of minority persons and EIP voting usage. Collectively, the findings suggest that the potential effects of Ohio’s proposed policy changes would not be equally distributed between racial groups.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent13 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSAGEen_US
dc.sourceSAGE Open, 2015, Vol. 5, No. 3
dc.subjectEarly votingen_US
dc.subjectElections
dc.subjectElectoral geography
dc.subjectRace
dc.subjectU.S. politics
dc.subjectVoting behavior
dc.titleThe Racial Context of Convenience Voting Cutbacks: Early Voting in Ohio During the 2008 and 2012 U.S. Presidential Electionsen_US
txstate.documenttypeArticle
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/2158244015591825
dc.rights.licenseThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
txstate.departmentGeography


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