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dc.contributor.authorRuch, Jennifer E.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-09T19:13:44Z
dc.date.available2019-09-09T19:13:44Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8628
dc.description.abstractThis article is intended to highlight the ways in which collective public memory of 1960s-1970s counterculture forged contemporary applications of cultural heritage both in fact and in myth. Specifically, it explores the development of countercultural music scenes from the 1960s through the 1970s within the regional context of Austin, Texas. According to Dirk Spenneman, cultural heritage is the "result of human interaction with the environment and one another." Since the value that groups and communities assign to both tangible and intangible forms of culture cannot be systematically predicted, cultural heritage is a human construct.en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent30 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Center for Texas Music Historyen_US
dc.sourceJournal of Texas Music History, 2018, Vol. 18, Issue 1, Article 1.
dc.subjectCountercultural sound
dc.subjectCultural heritage
dc.subject1960s
dc.subject1970s
dc.title'Far Out in Texas': Countercultural Sound and the Construction of Cultural Heritage in the Capital Cityen_US
txstate.documenttypeArticle


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