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dc.contributor.advisorTrepagnier, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Kristina ( )
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-26T13:30:15Z
dc.date.available2019-11-26T13:30:15Z
dc.date.issued2008-12
dc.identifier.citationBarnett, K. (2008). Community in the blogosphere: The social construction of textual community (Unpublished thesis). Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/8932
dc.description.abstractSome worry that people’s connection to each other is declining in contemporary society. I join the chorus of theorists who object to this notion and argue that people’s connections are changing instead of disappearing. In this thesis, I qualitatively investigate one new mode of human connection: blogging. Based on 34 online interviews, I describe the experience of blogging from the perspective of bloggers. I find that although the blogosphere may appear to be just another new type of broadcast medium through which people seek fleeting moments of micro-celebrity, blogs are interactive, and bloggers are community builders. Many are more focused on forming and maintaining rich online relationships than gaining fame. I show how bloggers experience many of the same things that people in offline communities experience. Then again, I also show that community in the blogosphere is deeply affected by the differences between face-to-face interaction and asynchronous, text-based Internet interactions.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent93 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectBlogs
dc.subjectComputer network resources
dc.subjectCommunities
dc.subjectSocial interaction
dc.titleCommunity in the Blogosphere: The Social Construction of Textual Community
txstate.documenttypeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentSociology
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University--San Marcos
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
txstate.accessrestricted
txstate.departmentSociology


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