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dc.contributor.authorOesteich, Jo Beth ( )
dc.contributor.authorFite, Kathleen E. ( )
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-13T17:34:03Z
dc.date.available2019-12-13T17:34:03Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-28
dc.identifier.citationOestreich, J. B., & Fite, K. (2019). Developing a professional identity in a global society. International Journal of the Whole Child, 4(2), pp. 43-52.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2474-297X
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/9073
dc.description.abstract

For decades, teacher attrition continues as a global concern; more teachers leave the profession than enter, especially among beginning teachers (Dassa & Derose, 2017). Research targeting the development of teacher identity describes how it transacts with teacher retention, motivation, and learning in diverse cultural and social contexts. These findings provide insight regarding successful pedagogical practices (Schutz, Hong, & Cross-Frances, 2018; Anspal, Eisenchmide, & Lofstrom, 2011).

Developing a professional identity as a teacher is a dynamic, complex, and ongoing process (Chang-Kredl & Kingsley, 2014; Ivanova & Skara-Minecāne, 2016). In teacher preparation programs, preservice students facilitate the development of their professional identity by focusing on why they want to become a teacher, why they think they will be effective, and how they can cultivate a culturally responsive classroom for their students (Muhammad, 2017).

Pre-service teachers facilitate a social, cultural, and global identity as they prepare children of diverse backgrounds as well as native learners to explore their roles in the macro and global societies (Lerseth, 2013; Chong, Ling, & Chuan, 2011). Additionally, preservice teacher candidates develop a geographic identity as they learn about the homelands of their students. This is important because this history shapes the identities of children and their families. Thus, in developing a professional identity, because teachers take the time to know themselves and their motivations, they become better able to frame the learning of their diverse students to meet the challenges of the global community.

en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent10 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMiddle Tennessee State University
dc.sourceInternational Journal of the Whole Child, 2019, Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 43-52.
dc.subjectTeacher attrition
dc.subjectTeachers
dc.subjectTeacher retention
dc.titleDeveloping a Professional Identity in a Global Societyen_US
txstate.documenttypeArticle
txstate.departmentCurriculum and Instruction


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