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dc.contributor.authorStover, Carla ( Orcid Icon 0000-0002-6767-5307 )
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Mi Jin ( )
dc.contributor.authorMayes, Linda ( Orcid Icon 0000-0002-9590-7128 )
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-10T19:15:08Z
dc.date.available2020-03-10T19:15:08Z
dc.date.issued2018-18
dc.identifier.citationStover, C. S., Choi, M. J., & Mayes, L. C. (2018). The moderating role of attachment on the association between childhood maltreatment and adolescent dating violence. Children and Youth Services Review, 94, pp. 679–688.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0190-7409
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/9369
dc.description.abstract

Approximately twenty percent of female and ten percent of male adolescents report violence in their dating relationships and there is a significant association between dating violence in adolescence and later perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV) in adulthood. Identification of factors associated with dating violence can inform intervention and prevention efforts. This study was designed to examine the associations of early childhood maltreatment experience and involvement in adolescent dating violence. It also aimed to identify the moderating effect of insecure attachment styles on these associations.

One hundred fifty adolescent who participated in a larger longitudinal study on prenatal drug exposure participated in this study. Participants completed self-report measures of childhood maltreatment at a standard follow-up visit between the ages of 15-19 years. Approximately 18 month later, they completed questionnaires on their attachment styles and level of dating violence perpetration and victimization.

Hierarchical regression modeling revealed a significant main effect for childhood abuse but not insecure attachment on perpetration and victimization of dating violence. Avoidant attachment significantly moderated the relationship between childhood abuse exposure and dating violence: For adolescents who reported an avoidant attachment style, an increase in the level of experienced childhood maltreatment predicted significantly higher increases in victimization by dating violence, compared to those did not have avoidant attachment.

Results suggest adolescents with child maltreatment history and avoidant attachment styles may be at higher risk for involvement in dating violence and support intervention efforts for fostering attachment relationship to attenuate the association between early exposures to maltreatment and involvement in dating violence later.

en_US
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent27 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.sourceChildren and Youth Services Review, 2018, Vol. 94, pp. 679–688.
dc.subjectChildhood maltreatment
dc.subjectAdolescent dating violence
dc.subjectAttachment
dc.titleThe Moderating Role of Attachment on the Association between Childhood Maltreatment and Adolescent Dating Violenceen_US
dc.typeacceptedVersion
txstate.documenttypeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the accepted manuscript version of an article published in Children and Youth Services Review.
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.09.011
dc.description.departmentSocial Work


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