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dc.contributor.advisorStafford, Mark
dc.contributor.advisorJamieson, J. D.
dc.contributor.authorCarreon, Jennifer R. ( )
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-30T14:40:35Z
dc.date.available2020-03-30T14:40:35Z
dc.date.issued2009-08
dc.identifier.citationCarreon, J. R. (2009). An examination of organized crime as a threat to national security (Unpublished thesis). Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/9536
dc.description.abstractThe overall growth of organized crime, including the extension of criminal organizations to criminal enterprises and the expansion into more sophisticated criminal avenues ( e.g., cyber crime) has become a cause for concern among federal law enforcement in America. Transnational organizations, such as Asian and Eurasian syndicates are affecting the economic state of the U.S. by embezzling millions of dollars through various fraudulent scams (healthcare fraud, phishing, credit card scams, id theft, insurance fraud, etc.) (Mukasey, 2008). This, in combination with the millions of drugs and weapons, and the hundreds of humans trafficked a year (for purpose of prosecution, slave trade, etc.) are all ways that organized crime could be considered a threat to national security in the U.S. It remains debatable however, as to what exactly constitutes a threat to national security. The purpose of this study is to examine the possibility of organized crime as a threat to national security. By conducting a series of in-depth interviews with Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force Agents, this paper takes a closer look at organized crime as a threat to national security.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent108 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectOrganized crime
dc.subjectNational security
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.titleAn Examination of Organized Crime as a Threat to National Security
txstate.documenttypeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentCriminal Justice
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University--San Marcos
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
txstate.accessrestricted
txstate.departmentCriminal Justice and Criminology


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