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dc.contributor.advisorRoss-Gordon, Jovita M.
dc.contributor.advisorReardon, Robert F.
dc.contributor.authorQuintero, Jessica M. ( Orcid Icon 0000-0001-9831-024X )
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-22T19:01:05Z
dc.date.available2020-04-22T19:01:05Z
dc.date.issued2020-05
dc.identifier.citationQuintero, J. M. (2020). I think I can; I know I can: Self-efficacy as an indicator of learner self-satisfaction with the learning experience in an online master of social work program (Unpublished dissertation). Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/9674
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this predictive non-experimental quantitative research was to determine if self-efficacy as a Master-of-Social-Work (MSW) student and/or self-efficacy as an online learner impacts learner self-satisfaction in an exclusively online MSW program. The study also examined characteristics associated with social work or online learner self-efficacy and learner self-satisfaction. Social Cognitive Theory was used as the theoretical perspective. The research was conducted at a small liberal arts college with a well-established online MSW program. A non-probability convenience sample of 43 incoming online MSW students was used as the study population. The findings suggest that there is not a significant relationship between Social Work Self-Efficacy and Self-Satisfaction or Online Learning Self-Efficacy and Self-Satisfaction. This study found that while students may be highly efficacious as MSW Students and Online Learners, they were not necessarily self-satisfied with their online learning experience. The study also found that students had an increase in their Social Work Self-Efficacy and persisted onto course completion. This persistence indicates that self-efficacy alone, and not self-satisfaction, may be a more accurate factor leading to student attrition. The findings indicate that the track  foundation for students with a bachelors in an unrelated field or advanced for students with a bachelors in social work  enrolled and social work experience are good predictors of Social Work Self-Efficacy and experience with online learning as being a good predictor of Online Learning Self-Efficacy. The findings of this research are relevant to institutions of higher learning seeking to establish or improve upon their online Master-of-Social-Work program. Implications for practice and recommendations for future research surrounding variables that predict or create high self-efficacy are suggested.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent99 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectExclusively online program
dc.subjectSocial work education
dc.subjectSelf-efficacy
dc.subjectStudent self-satisfaction
dc.titleI Think I Can; I Know I Can: Self-efficacy as an Indicator of Learner Self-satisfaction with the Learning Experience in an Online Master of Social Work Program
txstate.documenttypeDissertation
dc.contributor.committeeMemberAusbrooks, Angela
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKang, Haijun
thesis.degree.departmentCounseling, Leadership, Adult Education, & School Psychology
thesis.degree.disciplineAdult, Professional, and Community Education
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
txstate.departmentCounseling, Leadership, Adult Education, and School Psychology


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