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dc.contributor.advisorOsborne, Randall
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Heather Danielle ( )
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-04T14:23:25Z
dc.date.available2020-05-04T14:23:25Z
dc.date.issued2009-05
dc.identifier.citationEdwards, H. D. (2009). Impulsivity and its relationship to persistence during an ego-depleted state (Unpublished thesis). Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas.
dc.identifier.urihttps://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/9785
dc.description.abstractThe power to control or override one’s thoughts, emotions, urges, and behavior is a central function of the self and a fundamental key to success in life (Baumeister, Vohs, & Tice, 2007). This ability enables individuals to resist temptation, delay gratification, and to persist at demanding tasks. Research conducted by Baumeister and colleagues (1998) has demonstrated that any act of self-control results in the depletion of a limited resource akin to energy. Furthermore, once in a depleted state, individuals have difficulty persisting at subsequent tasks requiring self-control. These findings raise questions about individual differences in self-regulatory ability. This study examines the relationship between self-regulation and impulsivity. More specifically, the purpose was to observe how impulsiveness scores relate to persistence on a spatial cognitive task during an ego-depleted state.
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent66 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectImpulse control disorders
dc.subjectImpulsive personality
dc.subjectCompulsive behavior
dc.subjectSelf-control
dc.titleImpulsivity and its Relationship to Persistence During an Ego-Depleted State
txstate.documenttypeThesis
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEtherton, Joseph
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCzyzewska, Maria
thesis.degree.departmentPsychology
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University--San Marcos
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
txstate.accessrestricted
txstate.departmentPsychology


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